Your Hormones and Your Poor Diet

Poor eating habits precipitate more than just an enlarging waistline. They affect every aspect of your health, and although you may not notice it right away, your hormone levels suffer dramatically from sugary, fatty, and nutritionally-deficient foods. Many of your beneficial hormones will nose-dive, while the other more dangerous hormones – like insulin – skyrocket. Insulin Resistance Syndrome Our bodies do need sugar (glucose) as a fuel for our cells to perform their daily cellular functions. When we eat sugar or foods that are broken down into glucose such as high-glycemic carbohydrates, our body’s digestive process puts that glucose into the blood stream for the cells to collect and utilize. The cells rely on the pancreas to monitor the blood levels and to alert them when glucose is abundant. The pancreas does this by secreting insulin which circulates through our bodies delivering the message to the cells of glucose’s presence. In perfect balance, when we eat carbohydrates and produce glucose, the cells use it up as energy and there is little left over. When our cells ignore insulin and become resistant Over the course of years as we get older, become more sedentary, and our diets become “sugar loaded,” we process more glucose than our cells can use and the excess floats around in our blood, or is turned into fat in the cells. Insulin Resistance also increases the symptoms and/or risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome, contributing to: 1. Accumulation of body fat 2. Obesity 3. Elevated triglycerides 4. High blood pressure. 5. Acceleration of the aging process. Diet It is commonly accepted that eating large amounts of simple carbohydrates (pastas, breads, and sugar filled foods) could lead to Insulin Resistance, elevated cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and obesity. For this reason, as part of our program, we recommend that our patients change to a low-glycemic index diet. The Glycemic Index is the rate that carbohydrates break down into sugar in the blood. The best source of low-glycemic carbohydrates are vegetables. Vegetables are slow burning carbohydrates and help keep insulin levels steady. A diet rich in vegetables, proteins, good fats in the form of omega-3, and water is optimal for a long health span. It is important to point out that a single diet will not work for everyone. To optimize your nutritional needs you should visit with an experienced health care professional well versed in the issues of metabolic syndrome and nutrition. Editor’s Note: Targeting cellular health and energy support is key to helping your body regulate its hormones and get the most benefit from a healthy diet. A key supplement in metabolic support, cellular energy production and protection is POLY-MVA. Its unique complex of alpha lipoic acid, B-1 and the mineral palladium make it ideal for these types of situtiaons. Only ¼-1/2 tsp per day and you have the added benefit of a superior antioxidant while at the same time supporting energy production for you cells. Read more…